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Opting Out of Safety Measures
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Our community has pendants and a push button in the bathroom, and a HELP device in the bedroom to call for help.  The way the facility "checks" on individuals is to have a sign up sheet for evening meals.  If you get an evening meal, you mark your name off the sign up sheet.  If you are going to be away for the meal, you call the front desk to let them know.  If you haven't signed up for dinner, or called to say you would not be eating dinner, the front desk calls your unit to make sure you're OK.  If there is no answer, they will send someone to your unit to check to make sure you're OK.
 
We have pendants that were given to us when we moved in. We were not able to opt out when we moved in unless you consider not wearing them as a way to "opt-out." I believe residents who move in now can opt out of pendants because residents are charged for a newer smaller model. We received ours without additional cost when we moved in. We have latches on our front door which are put in an up position when security makes rounds about midnight. If the door has not been opened by 11:00 a.m. and our name is not on the away list, security will enter the apartment.

I could see why there would be a privacy concern with a motion sensor in the apartment.
 
(The following information is from Bob Hamilton posted from an email received by the LifeLine editor.)

From Day 1 in 1992 when the Terraces of Los Gatos(CA) was placed in service several safety features have been provided to help protect our aging population. Examples are an electronic pendant to call for help, a remote motion detector in each apartment that Security employees can use to monitor resident movement, and a yellow metal slider on each box in the mail room that residents can use to indicate they are up and about.

For whatever misguided reason, presumably a matter of privacy, a few of our residents have insisted on opting out of these programs. Our Resident Council accepts that a resident has the right to do this but we believe strongly that Administration should require a waiver to be signed by the resident.

Just recently one such opt-out was found in her apartment still alive on the floor after two days. She is now in skilled nursing but with brain damage and destined for a long stay. Any outcome you can think of for this event is bad for all parties.

We intend to press management to tighten up its safety practices and risk management. Have you run across this safety issue in
 
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